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Shiitake Mushroom Logs In Your Yard

Saturday June 17th 1:00PM – 3:00PM

Home Grown Community Garden Workshop

3000 E 20th St Kansas City Mo.

This is a Free workshop where you will learn about Shiitake Mushroom production on logs in a shady spot in your yard. You will learn which logs are compatible with growing Shiitake mushrooms and how to use sawdust spawn, the most economical method, to inoculate oak logs.

Shiitake mushrooms are a popular variety familiar to a growing number of local and gourmand food enthusiastic. You can purchase bulk Shiitake and other mushrooms at Kansas City HyVee and Price Chopper Grocers. The retail selling price is $9.00 – $16.00 per pound. You can grow your own and make productive use of Kansas City’s Urban Forest Products, tree trimming in your yard or neighborhood.

 We will inoculate logs for the Community Garden and interested neighbors. A limited number of logs and spawn kits will be available for participants (see order link).

Oaks logs 3”- 8” diameter about 40” long are best. Other local tree species that can be used are: hornbeam, ironwood, hard maple, and sweet gum.

 We recommend the online resource https://www.mushroompeople.com/how-to-cultivate-mushrooms-in-natural-logs/  for growing Shiitakes.

 Also  http://extension.missouri.edu/p/AF1010
 

 

Pop-Up Soil Solarization Workshop

Pop-Up Soil Solarization Workshop at Home Grown Community Garden

This will be a hands-on experience in removing unwanted grasses and opportunistic species without petro-chemicals or tilling.

Sunday May 21st 3:00 – 4:30PM

3000 E 20th St Kansas City, MO.

Much of the ‘lawn’ at Home Grown Community Garden is made up of Bermuda grass, dock, dandelions, creeping Charlie, henbit and dead nettle.

Our process for removal of the vegetation is called Solarization, using clear or black plastic film to cover the soil, capturing solar radiation to heat the soil killing the unwanted species.

We will first mow or clear plants and materials from the site. We then cover the soil surface with a plastic sheet covering to heat the soil. We will bury the edge so the hot air will not escape. The solar infrared radiation is trapped under the plastic sheet warming the soil with temperatures reaching as high as 180°F, killing current vegetation and many seeds and pathogens in the soil.

The restoration area is solarized using clear, 2 – 4 mill poly sheets from May/June till August killing off current plants and many seeds and pathogens.

The goal is to maintain daily soil temperatures above 110°F in the top 6 inches of the soil for six weeks.

We will divide the area into four plots and use different treatments to remove the unwanted vegetation, mainly the Bermuda grass. The first plot will be sprayed with a herbicide made from agricultural vinegar, salt and detergent (1) then solarized with clear plastic film.

The second will not be sprayed, just solarized with the clear film. The third will be sprayed with our mixture then solarized with black plastic and the forth plot only black plastic film.

For more information on soil solarization download KC Permaculture Extension Bulletin # N100 at:  http://: https://www.scribd.com/document/341549997/Native-Species-Establishment-Strategy-Using-Permaculture-Design-Principles 

Instructor:

Steve Mann

Ms Natural Resources

Graduate Certificate Agroforestry

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 Vinegar Herbicide Recipe

Heat in large pot

1 gal 20% vinegar

1 cup of salt and stir until the salt dissolves.

Let it cool, and then add 2 tablespoons of liquid dish soap.

Dilute with 1 gal water to make 2 gallons.

 

 

 

 

 

Pop-Up Workshop: In Your Yard Mushroom Remediation

We will construct oyster mushroom beds at Home Grown Community Garden and the new container home next door using woodchips and cardboard substrate. Participants can bring a garden container with soil (16” diameter or larger suggested) and create their own Mushroom Garden in a Pot to take home.

You will get hands on experience working with substrate and spawn while workshop leader, Steve Mann explains the potential and methods of mycoremediation for mitigation of dog waste and other environmental toxins in urban ecosystems.

Hands-On Workshop is free for everyone

Oyster mushroom spawn and substrate for your Patio Pot Mushroom garden – $ 15.00

Location: Home Grown Community Garden

3000 E 20th St

Kansas City Mo

More information on Mycoremediation:

Oyster mushrooms, Pleurotus ostreatus are used to break down complex carbon based toxins such as petroleum, benzene, antibiotics, personal care products and alkaline battery chemicals. Many of these are common pollutants in our urban environment.

Medical research has found that Oyster Mushroom produce statins and lovastatins that help in lowering LDL cholesterol in the body. Pleurotus ostreatus extract was also found to inhibit the proliferation of human breast and colon cancer cells.

This variety of fungus can also utilize common organic materials such as woodchips, bedding straw, garden refuse and even cardboard keeping these resources out of the waste stream. We can reap a harvest of highly nutritious, healing food while we remediate and build our soils.

Dog waste Mycoremediation

Mushroom mycelium can filter out toxins or break them down into inert chemicals before they ingest them. Mushrooms can then break down a wide array of contaminants such as petroleum byproducts, heavy metals and filter out fecal coliforms and other biological contaminates from soil and water.

The King Stropharia, Stropharia rugos is one of the most commonly used mushroom for creating mycofiltration barriers to process runoff contaminated with E.coli and other biological contaminants. They are also useful in grey water filtration systems.

Strategic placement of mushroom woodchip beds can create a porous, myceliated biomass filter network to keep dog and pet waste from fouling our stream and lakes.

You will learn a simple method to grow oyster and other mushrooms in your yard with woodchips, straw and cardboard in a shady spot where you can’t grow vegetable. After your mushroom patch is established and producing you can use it to seed sites that need to be restored in your neighborhood.

 

Workshop will be led by Steve Mann owner of Prairie Ecosystems Management

Agroforestry and Ecological Design/Consulting

Experience Willow

                                                 Salix interior along Missouri River Mid-Missouri

 Check out our 23 species of Willow for many uses, basket weaving, stream bank stabilization, phytoremediation and building.

 

Food Not Lawns Starts it’s 10th Year in Kansas City

FNLSpring 2017 flyer

Learn About Permaculture in Kansas City

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Pop-Up Workshop In Your Yard Mushroom Remediation

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Tuesday October 4, 2016                                    6:30 – 8:00

  • Presentation: Using mushrooms for Ecosystems Restoration in your yard
  • Hands on Oyster mushroom bed construction
  • Take home Oyster or King Stropharia mushroom spawn

Location: 5937 Charlotte Kansas City MO

Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pop-up-workshop-in-your-yard-mushroom-remediation-tickets-27990620700

 

Oyster mushrooms, Pleurotus ostreatus are used to break down complex carbon based toxins such as petroleum, benzene, antibiotics, personal care products and alkaline battery chemicals. Many of these are common pollutants in our urban environment.

Medical research has found that Oyster Mushroom produce statins and lovastatins that help in lowering LDL cholesterol in the body.  Pleurotus ostreatus extract was also found to inhibit the proliferation of human breast and colon cancer cells.

This variety of fungus can also utilize common organic materials such as woodchips, bedding straw, garden refuse and even cardboard keeping these resources out of the waste stream. We can reap a harvest of highly nutritious, healing food while we remediate and build our soils. We are ecosystems managers, becoming more integral to our Place on Earth.

You will learn a simple method to grow oyster and other mushrooms in your yard with woodchips, straw and cardboard utilizing a shady spot where you can’t grow vegetable. You will also receive enough oyster mushroom spawn to build your own 3’ x 3’ bed.  After your mushroom patch is established and producing you can use it to seed sites that need to be restored in your neighborhood.

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Participants will also enjoy appetizers prepared by our host, Debbie Glassberg, a fabulous Raw Food Chief. As a bonus you will get an inside look at Debbie’s gorgeous Container Home and front yard vegetable garden in Kansas City’s Brookside neighborhood.

debbies-sweet-potato-bed

Workshop will be led by Steve Mann owner of Prairie Ecosystems Management

Agroforestry and Ecological Design and Consulting

 

The cost of the workshop including mushroom spawn is $25.00

There are a limited number of spots available for this unique workshop so sign up early at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pop-up-workshop-in-your-yard-mushroom-remediation-tickets-27990620700

 

Kansas City Urban Permaculture Design Certification Course

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Urban Permaculture Design Course  focusing on the unique challenges and opportunities of the Urban Ecosystem. Permaculture design for urban and suburban homesteads and farms  including sections on:

  •           Local Food Systems
  •           Permaculture for Community Development
  •           Social and Environmental Justice
  •           Zone 00: Integral Permaculture theory
  •           Urban Ecosystems Restoration

Feb 23 – May 14th 2016

Tuesday evening classes 6-9pm, Saturday morning field day 9-noon

Offered by: Kansas City Permaculture Education,Extension, & Research (KCPEER)

at: Urban Farming Guys MakerSpace

3700 E. 12th St. Kansas City MO 64127

Syllabus and registration form

  Urban Permaculture Design Certification Course – Winter-Spring 2016 by Steve Mann

 

 

2015 Food Not Lawns Kansas City Sweet Potato Project

Prairie Ecosystems Management is handling the online orders for the Food Not Lawns Kansas City’s 2015 Sweet Potato Project.

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The Kansas City Sweet Potato Project is action and education about the benefits of having a sweet potato patch instead of a lawn patch. Sweet potatoes are a beautiful, highly nutritious edible landscaping plant that is an environmentally sound replacement for unsustainable lawns.

Started in 2008 by the local Food Not Lawns collaborative,  we  offer organic  sweet potato plants for sale and workshops covering:

  • Sweet potato planting,
  • Cultivation
  • Harvest
  • Storage.

Sponsored by:

Community Ecological Enterprise Hub

Antioch Urban Growers

Food Not Lawns Kansas City

Prairie Ecosystems Management like us on Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/PrairieESM 

 

 

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We are offering three verities this year of certified organic sweet potato slips developed to thrive in our bio-region.

Beauregard, Traditional Orange Skin / Orange Flesh  ORDERING OVER FOR THIS YEAR

Murasaki, Purple Skin / White Flesh Sweet Potato  SOLD OUT

O’Henry, White Flesh Sweet Potato  SOLD OUT

 

Sweet potato slip propagation is weather dependent . Sweet potatoes are a tropical plant that suffers when the soil temperature is lower than 50° so we cannot set a firm delivery date though it is usually the first week of June.

 

Order sweet potato slips for delivery June 4th – 12th 2015

Pick up at Antioch Urban Growers     2727 NE 44th St Kansas City Mo 64117

Please leave your email and phone number on order form message box.

Thank you and happy Sweet Potatoing!

 

AgroEcological Design Services

 

Prairie Ecosystems Management Web add color